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How to Fill a Nail Hole

This past spring/summer, my husband and I crammed a number of house projects into a span of about 3 months.  I was pregnant and wanted to get as much done as humanly possible before the baby arrived in the fall.  First, we moved my daughter into a new bedroom.  (You can check out her new “big girl” room here.)  Then, we redid our staircase and redecorated the entryway.  Next, we painted and redecorated the guest room.  And then, finally, we put together the nursery.  Whew!  I’m exhausted just recounting all of that on paper.  

I love to fill my walls up with pictures and decor.  So, when it comes to redoing a space, one of the first things we always do is fill in the existing nail holes.  That way, if we don’t end up hanging things in the exact same spaces, we won’t have exposed holes all over the place.

It’s super easy to do and doesn’t take much time, or many supplies, at all.

(This post contains affiliate links.  To see my full disclosure, go here.)

Supplies Needed

  1. Spackle
  2. Putty Knife
  3. Fine grit Sandpaper
  4. Paint

The first thing that needs to be done is remove the nails from the wall and find your holes.

Here's a simple tutorial for how to fill a nail hole. It only requires a few supplies and a few easy steps.

Next, take the spackle, and fill the hole with just enough to fill it in.  You don’t need a huge amount of spackle all over the wall – just enough to fill in the hole.  (Although sometimes my husband gets a bit carried away.  😀  )  

Here's a simple tutorial for how to fill a nail hole. It only requires a few supplies and a few easy steps.

If you have a tub of spackle instead of a squeeze tube, as pictured, don’t worry.  It’s still really simple.  Just get a small amount of spackle on the end of the putty knife (or even just your finger), and smear it across the hole to fill it in.

Then, take your putty knife and scrape it flat across the nail hole to remove any excess spackle.

Here's a simple tutorial for how to fill a nail hole. It only requires a few supplies and a few easy steps.

Let this dry for about an hour.  Then, using a fine grade sandpaper (220-grit), lightly sand over the filled in nail hole until it is smooth.

Here's a simple tutorial for how to fill a nail hole. It only requires a few supplies and a few easy steps.

If you aren’t repainting the entire room, all you need to do is touch up with a bit of the original paint.

This particular nail hole was in the room that we moved my daughter out of.  We were transforming the room into my son’s nursery.  So, we filled in all of the nail holes in the room, and repainted the whole thing.

Here's a simple tutorial for how to fill a nail hole. It only requires a few supplies and a few easy steps.
Here’s the wall before – after spackling and sanding.

 

Here's a simple way to fill in a nail hole. It only requires a few supplies and a few easy steps.
And here it is after filling, sanding, and painting.

Here's a simple way to fill in a nail hole. It only requires a few supplies and a few easy steps.

The wall on the left in the above photo is the one I’ve been photographing – just to give you a better perspective on the finished wall.  (To see the whole nursery, click here.)

As you can see, filling nail holes is so simple and definitely worth it!

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4 Comments

  1. Great info! Sometimes I forget people need to learn these simple skills. Thanks for sharing at the To Grandma’s House We Go DIY, Crafts, Recipes and More Wednesday Link Party! Have a great week and join us again!

    1. Yes! Same here. Just because it is something that I know how to do doesn’t mean that everyone does, right?! Thanks so much for the comment, and thank you for hosting!

  2. I can’t tell how often I’ve thought twice about hanging something on the wall because I know if I get it wrong, I’ll end up with pockmarks all over the place. I need to see if we can find some Spackle here in South Africa. Can it only be used on dry wall or can I use it for concrete walls too Amy?

    1. Oh, it’s so, so easy to fill nail holes. I don’t see any reason why it wouldn’t work on concrete, as long as you have a way to cover it, since it most likely won’t match the concrete. I’ll double check with my dad though, and let you know!

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